Home » Asian » Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

by The Devil Wears Salad

Complement the nutty flavours of this Forbidden Rice Salad with tasty sweet and umami shiro miso. Counterbalance the dense rice with the soft flakes of salmon and the creamy texture of edamame. What a beautifully balanced salad!

Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

Difference Between Wild Caught Salmon and Farmed Salmon

I have no doubt that you have been faced with the dilemma of eating farmed salmon. I certainly have, but the conundrum I’m in is the fact that it’s not easy to find wild salmon regularly and conveniently. With two-thirds of the salmon consumed being farmed fish instead of wild caught fish, it also means that the price tag associated with wild salmon is high.

So, the next evolution of the dilemma is whether we are better off not eating any salmon at all unless it’s wild salmon. Should we just cut it out from our diets altogether? I’m sure my vegan and plant-based friends would urge me to do so.

We have been told time and time again that it’s so important to add salmon into our diets as it’s a fatty fish, loaded with omega 3 fatty acids. Much like vitamin D, we simply don’t get enough of it naturally. So, introducing salmon into our meal plan makes a whole load of sense. Or does it?

Salmon bred in fish farms as opposed to being bred in their natural environment differ greatly in their nutrients. It is believed that it may even be harmful due to their breeding practices. Farmed fish are fed with processed feed, and like anything, it all comes down to the quality. Can you trust the feed? Can you trust what actually goes in it?

Wild salmon eat what is found in their natural environment such as krill, shrimp and other invertebrates. Farmed salmon don’t have access to all this natural goodness.

How to Tell the Difference Between Wild Salmon and Farmed Salmon?

The easiest way to tell the difference is the colour. Wild caught salmon has a deep red-orange colour whilst farm salmon is a lighter orange with no red hues. When you put them side by side, it’s a remarkable difference.

The difference in colour is due to a compound called carotenoids which are found in all the little critters that wild salmon eats.

The difference in colour is due to a compound called carotenoids which are found in all the little critters that wild salmon eats.

Unshelled edamame beans with fresh salmon fillet

What are the Nutritional Differences?

Wild salmon has more natural minerals, namely potassium, zinc and iron.

In terms of fat, you wouldn’t be surprised to know that farmed salmon is higher in fat, in fact, 3 times higher in saturated fat. Because of this fat, it is also higher in calories.

Should I Stop Eating Farmed Salmon?

Personally, salmon plays a role in our overall diet. Whilst I haven’t cut it out entirely, I have done 2 things.

Firstly, reduce the amount of farmed salmon I am consuming in general and secondly, doing my best to purchase wild salmon more frequently. Although I have to say that it has now become a bit of a luxury as the prices of wild caught fish is astronomical. Demand unfortunately far outweighs supply.

Understanding where your farmed salmon comes from does help with your decision-making process. There are some farms that practice great sustainable fishing and provide healthier diets and better breeding conditions. Some farms are strictly regulated and could provide us, consumers, with a better-quality product.

For now, I consume salmon in moderation. The farmed salmon I am able to get is of good quality and by no means cheap either.

Where do you stand on wild salmon vs farmed salmon?

Why Bake with the Skin On?

Even though we are not eating the salmon skin in this recipe, it is best to bake with it on. The salmon skin helps to keep the flesh from drying out. As we are after a firm finish but still a little pink on the inside, the skin will help us keep it moist.

If you put salmon on a grill or BBQ, the skin helps to keep the fish from burning on the underside and also stops the flesh from sticking to the grill.

Why I Love Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

Chef Nobu’s miso-marinated black cod was my first foray into miso fish. And oh my…. how good was it? For those of you who have tried his signature dish know what I mean. It literally melts in your mouth and one of the most delicious things you’ll ever eat.

Ever since then, miso-glazed salmon has become ever so popular, especially now that we know how to do it at home. And it really isn’t difficult at all. For this recipe, however, instead of grilling the fish, I wanted to bake it as I needed a more consistent finish for the entire fillet.

Adding the nutty flavoured forbidden rice and the creamy edamame just adds to our repertoire of unique salmon recipes. It’s so hearty and jam-packed with flavour.

How to Make Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

How to Bake the Salmon

When you’re purchasing your salmon fillet, try and get ones that are boneless, with the skin on.

Prior to marinating the salmon, run your fingers against the grain of the fish to make sure you there are no bones. If you feel them protruding, grab some kitchen tweezers and pull them out. You do not want bones in your dish! It’s like those Masterchef episodes where the contestant dies a thousand deaths when fish bones are found in their immaculate creation!

For the marinade, start by peeling the ginger and grating finely to yield 1 tbsp. In a medium size mixing bowl, add the white miso paste, mirin, sugar, ginger and soy sauce. Mix until well combined.

If you love miso, you should try our Miso Mayo Dressing and Tahini Miso Dressing recipes. They are really tasty and really adds to a salad recipe.

Place the salmon in the mixing bowl and coat the salmon thoroughly. Cover the mixing bowl and leave the fridge for 1 hour, or even overnight.

Preheat the oven on grill setting to 180°C or 360°F.

Take the salmon out of the fridge and remove excess paste from the fish. You only need a thin layer as otherwise, it will be too salty. Line a sheet pan with foil. Place the fish skin side down on the sheet pan. Grill in the oven for 10 minutes.

When cooked, remove from the oven and let it rest for a couple of minutes. Flake the salmon flesh and discard the skin.

How to Cook Forbidden Rice

Whilst the salmon is marinating, you can start on the rice.

Wash the uncooked forbidden rice thoroughly. Add ½ cup forbidden rice and 1 cup water into a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium to high heat.

Cover the saucepan and reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.

Once it’s cooked, turn the heat off and let it sit for a further 10 minutes.

Remove the lid and transfer the cooked forbidden rice into a small mixing bowl and let it cool down.

For you black rice lovers, try our Rustic Black Rice Salad with Purple Broccolini too!

Uncooked forbidden rice or black rice.

How to Cook Edamame

You can also do this step whilst the salmon is marinating.

Place the edamame in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain and remove the beans from the pod. Please note that 225g of unshelled edamame will yield ½ cup of beans.

If you have hulled edamame, they just need to go in boiling water for 2 minutes.

Unhulled and hulled edamame beans

How to Assemble the Forbidden Rice Salad

When the forbidden rice has cooled down, add 1 tsp of olive oil and mix thoroughly. Season with salt.

In a small mixing bowl, season the edamame with salt and pepper.

Add ¼ of the flaked salmon and ½ of the seasoned edamame into the bowl of forbidden rice. Gently mix through and place the salad onto a serving platter.

Place the rest of the flaked salmon on top of the salad on one side of the plate and the rest of the edamame on top of the salad on the other side of the plate.

Squeeze ¼ lemon on top of the salad.

Serve immediately.

If you’re after a salad with fish, I urge you to try this salad. The miso concoction slowly permeates itself into the fresh salmon, and when baked, it just flakes off to perfection. The flavours with the forbidden rice and edamame work incredibly well together. If you like, you can have it as a meal on its own too.

That’s all!

More Salmon Salad Recipes

Get inspired by the biggest collection of salad recipes in the one place. We have recipes to suit lifestyle preferences and different occasions. These salads are both delicious and stylish. Search for your favourite ingredient to find a salad you’ll love!

Search...
Generic filters

Easy Salad Dressing Recipes

Salad dressings are incredibly easy to make in the comfort of your own home. This way you can control the ingredients to suit your palate and you can make the exact portion you need for that one meal. We have a huge collection of recipes and you may just like some of these:

Best Salad Collections

Enjoy these recipe collections of salads for special occasions, fussy eaters and pure inspiration!

Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon
Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon
Print Recipe
5 from 12 votes

Forbidden Rice Salad and Miso Baked Salmon

Complement the nutty flavours of this Forbidden Rice Salad with tasty sweet and umami shiro miso. Counterbalance the dense rice with the soft flakes of salmon and the creamy texture of edamame. What a beautifully balanced salad!
Prep Time1 hr 10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Salad
Cuisine: Asian
Keyword: Main Meal Salads, Winter Salad
Dietary: Dairy Free, Egg Free, Gluten Free, Nut Free, Pescatarian
Food Group: Grains/Pasta/Rice, Seafood
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 227kcal
Author: Amy Chung

Ingredients

Salmon

Salad

  • ½ cup black rice, (forbidden rice)
  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup edamame, hulled
  • ¼ tsp olive oil
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • ¼ lemon

Instructions

Salmon

  • If you were unable to get boneless salmon, remove the bones with a tweezer.
  • Peel the ginger and grate finely to yield 1 tbsp.
  • In a medium size mixing bowl, add the white miso paste, mirin, sugar, ginger and soy sauce. Mix until well combined.
  • Place the salmon in the mixing bowl and coat the salmon thoroughly. Cover the mixing bowl and leave the fridge for 1 hour, or even overnight.
  • Take the salmon out of the fridge and remove excess paste from the fish.
  • Line a sheet pan with foil.
  • Place the fish skin side down on the sheet pan. Grill in the oven for 10 minutes.
  • When cooked, remove from the oven and let it rest for a couple of minutes. Flake the salmon flesh and discard the skin.

Salad

  • Wash the uncooked forbidden rice thoroughly. Add ½ cup forbidden rice and 1 cup water into a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium to high heat.
    Cover the saucepan and reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes.
    Once it’s cooked, turn the heat off and let it sit for a further 10 minutes.
    Remove the lid and transfer the cooked forbidden rice into a small mixing bowl and let it cool down.
  • Place the edamame in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain and remove the beans from the pod.

Assembly

  • When the forbidden rice has cooled down, add 1/4 tsp of olive oil and mix thoroughly. Season with salt.
  • In a small mixing bowl, season the edamame with salt and pepper.
  • Add ¼ of the flaked salmon and ½ of the seasoned edamame into the bowl of forbidden rice. Gently mix through and place the salad onto a serving platter.
  • Place the rest of the flaked salmon on top of the salad on one side of the plate and the rest of the edamame on top of the salad on the other side of the plate.
  • Squeeze ¼ lemon on top of the salad.
  • Serve immediately.

Equipment

Sheet Pan
Saucepan Small
Cups and Spoons
Knife Set

Notes

  • Be sure to check if your salmon fillet is free of bones, even if you have purchased boneless salmon. Run your fingers against the grain, and you’ll feel the sharp bones protruding. Use a set of tweezers to pull them out.
  • Whilst the salmon is marinating in the fridge, save time and cook the forbidden rice and edamame.
  • If you can find hulled edamame, just pop them in boiling water for 2 minutes.
  • If you are purchasing unshelled edamame, a 225g bag will yield ½ cup of edamame beans.
  • You can substitute edamame with broad beans or peas.

Nutrition

Calories: 227kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 23mg | Sodium: 733mg | Potassium: 380mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 17IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 30mg | Iron: 2mg
Tried this recipe? We’d Love To See It!Mention @thedevilwearssalad or tag #thedevilwearssalad!

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links at no additional cost to you.

10 comments

You may also like

10 comments

Avatar
Capri October 19, 2020 - 12:33 pm

5 stars
This was absolutely delicious! I loved the flavors. Thanks for the recipe!

Reply
The Devil Wears Salad
The Devil Wears Salad October 24, 2020 - 1:12 pm

You’re welcome Capri! Thanks for the feedback.

Reply
Avatar
Chef Dennis October 19, 2020 - 8:36 am

5 stars
I only eat wild caught Alaskan salmon and your salad sounds like a delicious way to enjoy it!

Reply
The Devil Wears Salad
The Devil Wears Salad October 24, 2020 - 1:10 pm

Yum! I wish we could get access to wild caught Alaskan salmon. It would be so fresh and authentic.

Reply
Avatar
Magali October 17, 2020 - 2:50 pm

5 stars
I love forbidden rice! Thanks for sharing this recipe! it’s amazing!

Reply
The Devil Wears Salad
The Devil Wears Salad October 24, 2020 - 1:07 pm

You’re welcome! Enjoy!

Reply
Avatar
Audrey October 16, 2020 - 9:44 pm

5 stars
So good!

Reply
The Devil Wears Salad
The Devil Wears Salad October 24, 2020 - 1:06 pm

Thanks Audrey!

Reply
Avatar
FOODHEAL October 16, 2020 - 2:09 pm

5 stars
I love the forbidden rice, it has that unique flavor that is so hearty and delicious. I love the way black and green compliments each other.

Reply
The Devil Wears Salad
The Devil Wears Salad October 24, 2020 - 1:05 pm

We love the nutty flavour of the forbidden rice. A great little salad to have on it’s own too.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Recipe Rating




* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.